COMPUTERS/INTERNET/SECURITY | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


COMPUTERS/INTERNET/SECURITY

Jun 23 08:46

A FLORIDA CITY PAID A $600,000 BITCOIN RANSOM TO HACKERS WHO TOOK OVER ITS COMPUTERS — AND IT'S A MASSIVE ALARM BELL FOR THE REST OF THE US

SOURCE: BUSINESSINSIDER.COM

A Florida city's council voted to pay a ransom of $600,000 in Bitcoin to hackers that targeted its computer systems — and the payout is a sign of how unprepared much of the US is to deal with a coming wave of cyberattacks.

The city council of Riviera Beach, Florida, 50 miles north of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, voted on Monday to meet the demands of its hackers in hope of getting back the city's compromised data, CBS News reported.

According to The Palm Beach Post, the attack began on May 29, when an employee from the police department opened an email attachment that contained malware.

The software quickly spread through the city's computer systems, affecting its email system and even the 911 dispatch operations.

The New York Times reported that the hackers demanded their ransom in bitcoin. The paper said there was no guarantee the hackers would honor their end of the deal after getting the money.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

Baltimore is still hurting from a cyber attack a couple of months ago, and it still hasn't come out from under the horrific mess it created.

Jun 23 08:43

BIOTECH, PHARMA, AND HEALTHCARE FIRMS REPORT HIGH LEVELS OF CYBERSECURITY INCIDENTS AND FRAUD

SOURCE: NATURALBLAZE.COM

By Sofia Adamson

As documented in an international study for the 2017-18, Kroll Annual Global Fraud & Risk Report, cyber security and fraud threats continue to achieve high levels in the biotechnology, healthcare, and pharmaceuticals industry.

78% of respondents reported that their companies had encountered an information threat or cyber incident, attack, or loss over the past twelve months. Only 7 out of 10 (67%) documented the existence of at least one security crash during the past 12 months.

The document unveils that respondents in the biotechnology, healthcare, and pharmaceuticals industry have a higher sense of susceptibility to security, fraud, and cyber risks, with information-related threats now being the part of highest concern.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

The unasked question here, seems to be how can their systems be so sensitive to hacks and attacks, and what can they do to stop this?!?

As all medical records are required to be in electronic format in the US, why isn't the DHT more forthcoming in giving health professionals more robust tools, for countering these problems?!? I mean, The Department of Homeland Security should have the capability for providing some tools available for those most in the most urgent need of cyber security, right?!?

and yet, we barely hear a yawn from DHS on this urgent problem.

Jun 23 08:18

Trump Ordered Secret Cyber Attacks On Iran As An "Alternative" To War Thursday Night

It's been revealed that President Trump did order an attack on Iran - but not a military assault - instead, the US initiated a major cyber attack against an Iranian intelligence outfit the Pentagon believes was part of last week's limpet mine incident involving two tankers in the Gulf of Oman.

According to Yahoo News, which first broke the story - which was later confirmed Saturday evening by CNN and The Washington Post - the "retaliatory digital strike" was launched on Thursday evening just as the world was bracing itself for possible US airstrikes on Iran:

On Thursday evening, U.S. Cyber Command launched a retaliatory digital strike against an Iranian spy group that supported last week’s limpet mine attacks on commercial ships, according to two former intelligence officials.

Jun 23 07:37

NATIONAL EMERGENCY ALERTS POTENTIALLY VULNERABLE TO SPOOFING

SOURCE: HOMELANDSECURITYNEWSWIRE.COM
On 3 October 2018, cell phones across the United States received a text message labeled “Presidential Alert.” It was the first trial run for a new national alert system, developed by several U.S. government agencies as a way to warn as many people across the United States as possible if a disaster was imminent. Now, a new study raises a red flag around these alerts—namely, that such emergency alerts authorized by the President of the United States can, theoretically, be spoofed.

On 3 October 2018, cell phones across the United States received a text message labeled “Presidential Alert.” The message read: “THISIS A TEST of the National Wireless Emergency Alert System. No action is needed.”

It was the first trial run for a new national alert system, developed by several U.S. government agencies as a way to warn as many people across the United States as possible if a disaster was imminent.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

This is nasty, and has to get fixed immediately. But the question remains; if this was so capable of getting spoofed, why didn't the developers of this program not see that and fix it earlier?!?

Jun 22 10:40

US CYBER COMMAND REPORTEDLY LAUNCHED A CYBERATTACK AGAINST IRAN AS TRUMP NIXED HIS MILITARY STRIKES

SOURCE: BUSINESSINSIDER.COM
United States Cyber Command on Thursday reportedly launched an operation against an Iranian spy group with ties to the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps, despite President Donald Trump's last-minute scrapping of a direct military strike, former intelligence officials said in a Yahoo News report.

The Iranian group is believed to have supported the limpet mine attacks against two tanker ships earlier last week, which resulted in the US increasing its military posture against the country. The group reportedly tracked and targeted both military and civilian vessels sailing through the Strait of Hormuz.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

My real concern this weekend, is that Israel will conjure something up something absolutely wicked, from which the US government and military will not be able to walk away.

IF President Trump thinks that such a thing is impossible, because he and Netanyahu are such BFFs, I would strongly caution him to think again; this wouldn't be the first time Israel tried a stunt like the attack on the USS Liberty, which Israel tried to blame on Egypt.


New Evidence Proves Israel Attacked USS Liberty With Orders to Kill 294 Americans

The article goes on to state: "America is commemorating the 52nd anniversary of the Israeli attack on USS Liberty.

This article was first published on November 14, 2014

Fresh evidence presented in an exclusive Al Jazeera investigation into the Israeli attack on the USS Liberty that killed 34 Americans proves the incident was not a mistake. Since 1967 the ‘official story‘ has been that Israel simply misidentified the American ship as Egyptian for several hours. Israel apologized to the United States and for several decades we’ve been led to believe that this could be the only explanation for why Israeli jets and torpedo boats would launch rockets, missiles and torpedoes at an American target for more than two hours.

A new documentary called ‘The Day Israel Attacked America” airing on Al Jazeera was produced and directed by award winning British film maker Richard Belfield. Thanks to the audio evidence obtained by Belfield, it is finally possible to prove the survivors of the attack on the USS Liberty were right all along. The survivors have always been extremely confident that Israel’s intentions were to sink that ship and kill everyone on board so Egypt could be blamed for the tragedy. Why? To convince President Lyndon Johnson (and the American public) that we needed to declare war on Egypt. This is the definition of a ‘false flag‘. (can you say 9/11?)"

Jun 21 08:47

Cyberwarfare escalation just took a new and dangerous turn

The rhetoric surrounding cyberwarfare has ratcheted up again, potentially creating an unwelcome development in an area where misunderstanding and confusion could easily lead to escalation.

The New York Times has reported that the US has escalated its plans to place malware in Russia power networks, in response to similar and ongoing online incursions by Russia-backed hackers.

This is the latest development in online hostilities involving power grids; energy companies have long been the targets of cyber-espionage, but in recent years the intent has switched from spying to creating outages.

Jun 20 18:48

Google admits bug could let people spy on Nest cameras

The issue was first raised by a user on Facebook who recently sold his Nest Cam Indoor yet was still able to access its feed. The problem involves Wink, an app that lets people manage multiple smart devices regardless of their developer. The Facebook user noted that despite carrying out a factory reset on his Nest camera before selling it, his Wink account remained connected to the device, allowing him to view snapshots of the buyer’s live feed.

Wirecutter tested the vulnerability on its own Nest Cam by linking it to a Wink account and then performing a factory reset. The publication also found it was receiving “a series of still images snapped every several seconds” via its Wink account.

“In simpler terms: If you buy and set up a used Nest indoor camera that has been paired with a Wink hub, the previous owner may have unfettered access to images from that camera,” Wirecutter says. “And we currently don’t know of any cure for this problem.”

Jun 20 18:40

Facebook usage falling after privacy scandals, data suggests

Since April 2018, the first full month after news of the Cambridge Analytica scandal broke in the Observer, actions on Facebook such as likes, shares and posts have dropped by almost 20%, according to the business analytics firm Mixpanel.

Jun 20 15:56

Sensitive data of more than 250 MILLION people to be handed over to Amazon as the US upgrades security on a system used to identify suspected terrorists, immigrants and criminals

Amazon will be looking after biometric data on more than 250 million people as the US Department of Homeland security seeks to upgrade its identification systems.

It is part of a plan to replace the department's existing biometric/biographic database setup with a more secure system which may add new identification tools.

Amazon's database will contain biographic information alongside fingerprint, iris and face scans and may eventually incorporate images of identifying scars and tattoos.

The news will raise alarm bells for some due to fears over how tech companies are gathering personal information and just what they are - and should - be doing with it.

Jun 20 15:41

Mozilla Firefox 67.0.4 Fixes Second Actively Exploited Zero-Day

Mozilla has released Firefox 67.0.4 to fix a security vulnerability that has been used in targeted attacks against cryptocurrency firms such as Coinbase. Users of Firefox should immediately install this update.

This week, Mozilla released Firefox 67.0.3 to fix a critical remote code execution vulnerability that was being used in targeted attacks. Since its release, it was discovered that the vulnerability and another unknown one was chained together as part of a phishing attack to drop and execute malicious payloads on victim's machines.

Today, Mozilla released Firefox 67.0.4 that fixes the second unknown vulnerability that was used during this chained attack.

Jun 20 14:56

Tucker Calls Out The Koch Brothers For Working With The ADL to Censor Conservatives Online

Wednesday night on Fox News, Tucker Carlson highlighted how the Koch brothers are working against the interests of the average Republican voter and are actively partnering with groups like the Anti-Defamation League to censor the internet.

Jun 20 10:57

Researchers Turn to Amazon and Google For Bedroom Health Surveillance

By Jason Erickson

Yes, literally listening to people's bedrooms in the name of health security...

A new press release from the University of Washington highlights how researchers are aiming to leverage the growth of in-home smart tech devices...

Jun 20 09:52

Researchers find that both iOS and Android apps have insecure data storage - and that could lead to passwords, financial information user locations and other personal data being accessed by cyberattackers.

Researchers find that both iOS and Android apps have insecure data storage - and that could lead to passwords, financial information user locations and other personal data being accessed by cyberattackers.

Jun 20 09:31

Complete Technical Breakdown of Facebook’s New Cryptocurrency “Libra”

By Ivan Liljeqvist

Facebook’s new cryptocurrency Libra explained by a programmer who is running the test net code and read all of the documentation. Ivan Liljeqvist gives a complete breakdown of Libra’s technology, opportunity and potential pitfalls on his YouTube channel “Ivan On Tech”.

Watch the video below:

Jun 20 08:39

UK to indefinitely delay age-verification system for online porn

The United Kingdom will likely delay its controversial age-verification system for online pornography ‘indefinitely,’ according to a report from Sky News. Citing multiple sources, Sky News says Jeremy Wright, the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport secretary overseeing the UK’s regulation of the internet, will announce the delay tomorrow in British Parliament.

Jun 20 08:37

Alarming and unnecessary: Facebook’s new cryptocurrency must be resisted

Have you heard about Facebook’s new “cryptocurrency”, called Libra? Its basic pitch boils down to “we messed up your privacy and gave your data to all sorts, and let foreign actors screw up your elections – now let’s see what we can do with banking!”

Jun 20 08:34

A Florida city paid a $600,000 bitcoin ransom to hackers who took over its computers — and it's a massive alarm bell for the rest of the US

A Florida city's council voted to pay a ransom of $600,000 in Bitcoin to hackers that targeted its computer systems — and the payout is a sign of how unprepared much of the US is to deal with a coming wave of cyber attacks.

Jun 20 08:32

Former Senate Aide Gets Four Years In Prison For Mass Doxxing Of Republicans

A federal judge on Wednesday sentenced a former Democratic aide to four years in prison for hacking Senate computers, using spy devices and “doxxing” Republicans.

Jackson Cosko — a former aide to Democratic New Hampshire Sen. Maggie Hassan, Democratic California Sen. Barbara Boxer and Democratic Texas Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee — stole the entire contents of Hassan’s computer systems in October 2018 and published the private information of Republicans, including home addresses and cell phones. He hoped to intimidate them over Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination.

The same day, prosecutors charged a second Democratic aide with computer fraud and tampering with evidence for her role as an accomplice to Cosko.

Jun 19 13:34

Josh Hawley Introduces Bill to Put Washington In Charge of Internet Speech

Sen. Josh Hawley (R–Mo.) is introducing legislation to clamp down on free expression online, under the pretense of fighting tech-company "bias" against Republicans.

Hawley's solution is to amend Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, a measure that prevents individual users of internet platforms and the companies that run them from being treated as legally indistinguishable from one another. Without it, digital companies and the users of their products (i.e., all of us) could be sued in civil court or subject to state criminal prosecution over content and messages created and published by others.

State attorneys general have been howling about Section 230 for more than a decade because it means that only the federal government can criminally prosecute internet intermediaries. Thus, state prosecutors don't have the opportunity to seize assets and bring in big financial settlements themselves.

Jun 19 10:00

‘AGE OF DIGITAL TERRORISM’ IS COMING, IMPACT MAY BE AS DANGEROUS AS WMDS – MOSCOW

SOURCE: RT
Terrorist groups exploit the internet for hacking and global outreach, the impact of which could soon become no less dangerous than that of weapons of mass destruction, a senior Russian security official warned.

The rapid development of technology allows terrorists to “even more actively” use the internet for “recruitment, attracting funds, hacking and other cybercrimes,” the deputy secretary of Russia’s Security Council, Yury Kokov, said at a security-themed event in the city of Ufa in central Russia.

The official said the internet has become the “main mechanism” for various extremists to “control their scattered forces and resources,” while there are currently around 30,000 “extremist and terrorist websites” online.

This allows us to conclude that an age of technological and digital terrorism is approaching. In terms of consequences, [this type of terrorism] may be comparable to the weapons of mass destruction in the nearest future.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

Deputy Secretary Kokov, with all due respect, this digiterror is already here; have you not seen the chaos in the US city of Baltimore, because its computers got hacked with ransomware?!?

Hackers have been holding the city of Baltimore’s computers hostage for 2 weeks:
A ransomware attack means Baltimore citizens can’t pay their water bills or parking tickets.

To the best of my understanding, this issue has not yet been resolved.

And there is another reason these terrorists are training "frogmen"; that is to destroy fiber optic cables, which connects countries for communication purposes.

Jun 19 09:41

VOX, AN ANTI-IMMIGRATION PARTY, HAS 24 SEATS IN SPANISH PARLIAMENT AND 3 IN EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT.

Spain's far right party, Vox-es, has demanded an explanation from Youtube, as to why their account was suspended "without any explanation."

Webmaster's Commentary: 

The answer is transparently simple; Youtube doesn't like their perspective, therefore, the channel had to be closed down.

This is the digital violence of this world's very monied far left; deplatform; demonetize; and destroy the work anyone, who has the temerity not to think precisely, as they do.

Jun 18 20:30

Awoogah! Awoogah! Firefox fans urged to update and patch zero-day hole exploited in the wild by miscreants

Mozilla has released an emergency critical update for Firefox to squash a zero-day vulnerability that is under active attack.

The Firefox 67.0.3 and ESR 60.7.1 builds include a patch for CVE-2019-11707. The vulnerability is a type confusion bug in the way Firefox handles JavaScript objects in Array.pop. By manipulating the object in the array, malicious JavaScript on a webpage could get the ability to remotely execute code without any user interaction.

This is a bad thing.

What's worse, Mozilla says it has already received reports that the flaw is being actively exploited in the wild by miscreants, making it critical for users to install the latest patched versions of the browser.

Jun 18 20:26

Smash GandCrab: Free tools released to decrypt files scrambled by notorious ransomware

Victims of the latest incarnations of the GandCrab ransomware now have a way to reclaim their files without paying a penny to extortionists, thanks to the release of a decryption tool.

Infosec shop BitDefender said this week it has teamed up with eight crime-fighting government agencies – including the FBI, London's met Police, and Europol – to develop software that can decrypt documents scrambled by the various flavors of ransomware that circulate under the GandCrab banner. The decryption tools, available for free from the No More Ransom Project, is able to unlock files that had been encrypted by the latest version, 5.2, of the notorious Windows ransomware.

Jun 18 11:36

US Cyber Attack on Russia’s Power Grid Is an ‘Act of War’

Russia and the US are engaging in tit-for-tat hacking of each others’ power grid, the New York Times is reporting, in what is really a kind of cyber “cold war” where the hackers from each country’s military and intelligence services load electronic “explosives” in the computer systems of critical infrastructure of the other, that in a crisis or war could be “detonated” to create chaos or bring down electric grids.

The Times article, the publication of which President Trump decried in a tweet as “close to treason,” was disturbing for a number or reasons. One was that sources told the Times the hacking by the US Cyber Command of Russia’s power grid had been conducted without the president’s knowledge, for fear that he might act to prevent it or might disclose it.

Jun 18 09:41

UK porn block is a 'privacy timebomb' warns watchdog amid fears that ID checks could expose your personal data AND sexual fantasies

The age-verifying ID checks to be instigated in the UK's new porn block could expose people's personal data alongside their sexual fantasies, experts warn.

The porn block is intended to keep children from viewing adult material online, but will require all legal porn viewers to submit personal records to prove their age.

Researchers are cautioning that proposed regulations to protect this personal data is woefully inadequate, turning the impending porn block into a 'privacy timebomb'.

Jun 18 09:08

Donald Trump Flips Out Over NYT Report On New US Aggression With Russia | Rachel Maddow |

Jun 18 09:00

Russia Thwarts US Cyber Attacks on Its Infrastructure

Expanding on weekend reports that the US had been carrying out cyberattacks against Russia’s electricity grid and other infrastructure, Russian news agencies are quoting unnamed security sources who say that the US attacks were thwarted.

Kremlin officials said they consider the reports “worrying,” and that a major cyber war was possible. Security officials said that so far they remain able to neutralize all of the US attempts to infiltrate and plant malware in the systems.

Jun 17 20:24

ALIS through the looking glass: F-35 fighter jet's slurpware nearly made buyers pull out – report

The F-35 fighter jet project has been hit by yet another set of controversies including a kerfuffle over US data-slurping, flight control problems and its stealth coating melting at supersonic speeds.

Once described by The Register as the ultimate vendor lock-in project, the F-35 is sold by Lockheed Martin as a package: not only do you buy the jets and their associated spares and training packages, you also buy its Autonomous Logistics Information System (ALIS).

ALIS is a spares and training management package. It tracks the state of the aeroplanes themselves, interfaces with onboard diagnostic systems to check system and component health, and orders spare parts as and when needed. As you can imagine, having access to ALIS gives you an instant and incredibly detailed picture of whether an F-35 squadron is capable of flying and fighting – or not.

Naturally, some countries buying the F-35 aren't happy about this.

Jun 17 20:18

Sad SACK: Linux PCs, servers, gadgets can be crashed by 'Ping of Death' network packets

It is possible to crash network-facing Linux servers, PCs, smartphones and tablets, and gadgets, or slow down their network connections, by sending them a series of maliciously crafted packets. It is also possible to hamper FreeBSD machines with the same attack.

Given that Linux powers an incredible amount of stuff these days, anything from network or internet-connected TVs, routers, thermostats, light switches, CCTV cameras, and robot vacuum cleaners, to servers, PCs, Android and ChromeOS devices, smart fridges, dialysis machines, car infotainment systems, tractors, construction equipment, and uranium centrifuges, and so on, can be potentially brought to a halt by miscreants if vulnerable.

Strangers can ping some data to your device over the internet or network, and potentially crash it, in other words. Not great, not terrible; it's a rather big annoyance that could disrupt netizens if script kiddies start firing off waves of exploits.

Jun 17 14:58

South American outages cast doubt on safety of internet-connected smart grids as experts warn they can easily be hacked

Massive outages in South America have cast doubt on the security of modern power grids and the 'smart' technology that could make them more vulnerable.

Across Argentina, Uraguay and Paraguay 44 million people were left in the dark when interconnected power grids failed, cutting electricity for homes, infrastructure, hospitals and more.

While the cause remains undetermined, some are calling attention to the rising adoption of 'smart' grid technology and its potential to vastly increase the risk of vulnerabilities for grids in US and across the world.

Jun 17 11:44

DJI's New Drone Teaches Kids Robotic Warfare

China, the rising power of the world, has seen one of its most popular drone companies step into the education market with a new robot that teaches children robotics, coding, and warfare.

DJI, the world's largest drone maker, has branched out from its traditional Phantom and Mavic drones to an entirely new land-based robot called RoboMaster S1 will allow children to discover new technologies at an early age.

On June 11, the company unveiled the S1 in China. The new robot features 31 sensors, a stabilized camera, and a laser/pellet gun. Children, mostly Chinese at the moment, have had an early lead on getting their hands on these new, high-tech robots. When the S1s battle, there are hit-detecting sensors on each side of the vehicle that will allow the winner of each fight to immobilize their opponent(s).

Jun 17 11:43

Huawei's Plan B: Meet The Russia-China OS

The US ban on Huawei is pushing it to develop alternative systems that may rival Google and Android...

Jun 17 10:25

SIM swap horror story: I've lost decades of data and Google won't lift a finger

At 11:30 pm on Monday, 10 June, my oldest daughter shook my shoulder to wake me up from a deep sleep. She said that it appeared my Twitter account had been hacked. It turns out that things were much worse than that.

Jun 17 10:12

Samsung’s security reminder makes the case for not owning a Samsung smart TV

Samsung has reminded owners of its smart TVs that they should be regularly scanning for malware using its built-in virus scanning software. “Prevent malicious software attacks on your TV by scanning for viruses on your TV every few weeks,” a (now deleted) tweet from the company’s US support account read alongside a video attachment that demonstrated the laborious process.

The obvious question here is why in the world doesn’t Samsung automate this process. When so many people don’t even know how to turn off motion smoothing, what are the chances that they’re going to be mindful of security practices? It also illustrates how dumb some smart TVs can be.

Jun 17 05:07

'Most dangerous' hackers targeting U.S. utilities — report

Some of the world's most dangerous hackers have zeroed in on the U.S. power sector in recent months, according to a nonpublic alert issued by the North American Electric Reliability Corp. this spring and new research.

The grid regulator sounded the alarm on March 1 with the industrial cybersecurity firm Dragos Inc. over a notorious hacking group known as "Xenotime" in the report. Xenotime has been spotted hitting U.S. electric utilities with "reconnaissance and potential initial access operations" since late last year, the alert said.

Jun 16 10:01

Axing America’s Android: Huawei files to trademark own mobile operating system worldwide

Chinese technology giant Huawei is in the process of launching its “Hongmeng” operating system (OS) to replace Google’s Android OS, the firm’s vice president of public affairs and communications Andrew Williamson, has said.

Huawei was blacklisted last month by US President Donald Trump’s administration which accused the company of spying for the Chinese government. The world’s biggest maker of telecoms network gear was barred from doing business with US tech companies, including Alphabet’s Google, whose Android OS is used in Huawei’s phones.

Jun 16 06:15

THE UNHOLY ALLIANCE BETWEEN DNA SITES AND FACIAL RECOGNITION

SOURCE: THEORGANICPREPPER.COM

BY DAGNY TAGGART

Technology that was once only seen in dystopian science fiction is rapidly infecting real life. Two means of collecting personal data – DNA databases and facial recognition software – are forming an unholy alliance, and the privacy implications could be devastating.

Privacy concerns surrounding DNA and facial recognition aren’t anything new. As the popularity of DNA genealogy websites like Ancestry DNA and 23andMe increase, so do questions over who has access to that data and how it will be used. The use of facial recognition and other biometric data technology is on the rise, and people are expressing concerns (and outrage) about that technology as well.

Genealogy sites have been making the news of late, mainly for concerns over how our personal data is used – and who has access to that information.

ENGINEERS ARE FIGURING OUT HOW TO MATCH DNA TO FACES IN A DATABASE.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

Humankind is, swiftly, falling down into the " digital rabbit hole", where any dystopian government can use this kind of information to tar an innocent person, make it appear that they were at a crime scene, and did the crime, to shut them up, and shut them off, if their narrative or questions did not meet the precise narrative of that government.

This... is truly chilling.

Jun 16 05:43

The Unholy Alliance Between DNA Sites and Facial Recognition

Technology that was once only seen in dystopian science fiction is rapidly infecting real life. Two means of collecting personal data – DNA databases and facial recognition software – are forming an unholy alliance, and the privacy implications could be devastating.

Jun 16 05:41

Social media erupts as Target checkout registers malfunction across the country

# TargetDown was trending on social media after Targets across the country were hit with outages, leading to headache for customers trying make purchases on Saturday.

Target said in a statement that it was working to resolve the issue as hundreds of people remained trapped in long lines, some abandoning ship and leaving their grocery-laden carts strewn about at many of the company’s 1,800-plus stores in the U.S.

“We’re aware that guests are currently unable to make purchases at Target stores. Our teams are troubleshooting now and we apologize for the inconvenience. We will provide an update as soon as possible,” Target said over social media.

Jun 16 05:22

Hack away! NYT says US planted CYBER KILL SWITCH in Russian power grid… media shrugs

The best defense is a good offense: the US seems to have taken this maxim to its logical conclusion, and has “aggressively” hacked Russia’s power grid, according to a new report. God forbid the shoe were on the other foot.

An in-depth report in the New York Times on Saturday lays out an alleged ongoing US operation to penetrate and implant malware in Russia’s power grid, partly as “a warning” to Moscow, and partly to stake out the high ground should competition between the two powers one day spill over into outright cyber warfare.

Jun 16 05:18

US ramps up attacks on Russian power grid

The Pentagon is intensifying its attacks on Russia’s power grid in the latest sign of a growing cyber war between the U.S. and the Kremlin.

The U.S. has infiltrated Russia’s electric power grid among other unnamed targets, inserting American malware into the systems in response to heightened Russian cyber aggression and political meddling, including efforts to influence recent U.S. elections, according to the New York Times.

Although the Times provided few specific details on the attacks, officials said U.S. malware has the potential to cripple Russia’s electric infrastructure and is unprecedented in terms of its reach and aggressiveness.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

I wish to remind everyone that the US has set a policy that a cyber attack on infrastructure would be considered an act of war.

Jun 15 12:12

Scott Adams: Who Will Win Democrat Debates, Odds of War With Iran, Foreign Influence

Comments at:

President Trump is schooling America on how to be smart
Russian citizen offers you information, what’s your objective?
Iran should “trust their God” and allow their people internet access
MAJOR healthcare news…and it wasn’t reported by ANY network
Mexico can’t admit the cartels control their northern border area
Mexico can’t do anything about the cartels
Comparing social media traffic across platforms…topic related censoring?
Democrat debates:
Who is capable of breaking out as a star?
Who will see their poll numbers drop after the debates
“Poortown” concept for cheap water, cheap energy, improved homes
New standards to improve quality of life

Jun 15 11:09

Thousands Sign Petition Calling for 5G Ban at Glastonbury Festival. No Scientific Evidence 5G is Safe.

By B.N. Frank

In February, telecom industry representatives gave U.S. congressional testimony that they could provide no scientific evidence that 5G technology is safe. Plenty of research has determined it’s not safe. The World Health Organization (WHO) recently warned that increasing levels of Electromagnetic Fields (EMF) could lead to increased health issues for 30% of the population. Experts have warned about this before. Other health experts – including the American Academy of Pediatrics – have been warning for years now that children are more affected by exposure than adults.

It doesn’t make sense that despite all of this (and more) 5G is still being promoted and unleashed around the world. Opposition is growing, though – including in the town of Glastonbury, England whose council has voted against installing it there for now...

Jun 15 09:50

The Unholy Alliance Between DNA Sites and Facial Recognition

By Dagny Taggart

Technology that was once only seen in dystopian science fiction is rapidly infecting real life. Two means of collecting personal data – DNA databases and facial recognition software – are forming an unholy alliance, and the privacy implications could be devastating.

Privacy concerns surrounding DNA and facial recognition aren’t anything new. As the popularity of DNA genealogy websites like Ancestry DNA and 23andMe increase, so do questions over who has access to that data and how it will be used. The use of facial recognition and other biometric data technology is on the rise, and people are expressing concerns (and outrage) about that technology as well...

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