In 1974, Egypt had to get a passport for the legendary pharaoh Ramesses II so that his 3,000-year-old mummy could be flown to Paris | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

In 1974, Egypt had to get a passport for the legendary pharaoh Ramesses II so that his 3,000-year-old mummy could be flown to Paris

Ramesses II was one of the most powerful rulers of Ancient Egypt. He reigned in the 12th century B.C. for approximately 66 years, which was an unusually long time for a pharaoh, as the third pharaoh of the Nineteenth Dynasty of Egypt.

Egyptologists of the 19th century nicknamed him “Ramesses the Great” after they discovered that numerous archaeological sites across modern-day Egypt, Sudan, and Palestine contained monuments, temples, palaces, and shrines built in his honor. One of the most impressive structures built under Ramesses is the Ramesseum, a monumental memorial temple which still stands within the vast Theban necropolis.

The nickname “Great” was apparently well-deserved, as historical sources prove that the mighty pharaoh governed Egypt at a time of abundance, prosperity, and military conquests. His father, Pharaoh Seti I, known as Ramesses I, came from a non-royal family and took the throne some time after the demise of Akhenaten, a pharaoh who attempted to convert Egyptians to a newly-introduced monotheistic religion. Seti I made his son a military general when little Ramesses was merely 10 years old and appointed him Prince Regent when he was 14. The young prince then received extensive military training and was also given control over his own harem.

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