BOEING CHANGES ITS STORY, ADMITS 'SOFTWARE GLITCH' DISABLED CRITICAL ALERTS ON 737 MAX | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

BOEING CHANGES ITS STORY, ADMITS 'SOFTWARE GLITCH' DISABLED CRITICAL ALERTS ON 737 MAX

In a clarification that only created more confusion, Boeing said Monday that an alert intended to notify pilots when the plane might be receiving erroneous data from one of the 737 MAX 8's 'angle of attack' sensors wasn't disabled intentionally, as WSJ reported on Sunday, but that the feature had been disabled because of a previously undisclosed software glitch.

What's confusing is that Boeing had confirmed WSJ's story that the aerospace company had neglected to tell the FAA and Southwest, the biggest customer for the 737 MAX 8, that the alert feature had been disabled because it had been made a new 'optional' safety feature. The alerts would have warned pilots that the plane's MCAS system might be about to misfire.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

This admission may well put Boeing into bankruptcy, for their software engineers to make such a completely bone-headed decision, and have it be completely supported by upper management.

Of course, the monied rarely eat their own, so when this issue goes to trial, it will probably result in a " money junkie slap on the wrist" for their chief executives.

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