The Community in Hawaii Stepped In Beautifully When the Government Failed to Help People Displaced by a Volcano | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


The Community in Hawaii Stepped In Beautifully When the Government Failed to Help People Displaced by a Volcano

The volcano didn’t start slowing down its eruptions until August. P?hoa in the Puna District was especially affected, leaving residents in a constant state of uncertainty.

And of course, the government failed to provide sufficient relief.

It’s no secret that the government – more specifically – FEMA, often fails to act adequately or quickly enough when disaster strikes. FEMA has been cited in on-the-ground reports to turn community help away when people bring food, citing ridiculous regulations. Yet some of the food they provided after Hurricane Matthew was allegedly mal-nourishing and didn’t meet basic calorie requirements. To make matters worse, a year after the hurricane, the crumbling infrastructure still needed repair and families still needed help – yet FEMA froze the Matthew fund, to send those monies to other, more pressing hurricane relief efforts.

Currently, there are tiny homes to serve as “mother-in-law apartments” and tiny homes made with glass to serve as nature-loving, glamorous camp destinations (otherwise known as “glamping”).

So why can’t tiny homes be used to shelter people after a traumatic disaster?

Enter: Tiny Homes for the Big Island

After weeks, hundreds and hundreds of residents still found themselves in a state of displacement. In fact, it took at least five weeks for the government to announce that it would give $12 million dollars to help disaster victims. But with the government in over its head on how to provide shelter, the community banded together to rapidly build 20 micro houses in early June.

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