Senators Question DOJ’s Surveillance of Americans’ Cell Phone Location Records | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

Senators Question DOJ’s Surveillance of Americans’ Cell Phone Location Records

A bipartisan group of senators questioned the Justice Department this week regarding how the government’s treatment of cellphone-generated location data in national security cases has changed in lieu of the Supreme Court decision in Carpenter v. United States last June.

The Carpenter case addressed the application of the Fourth Amendment to cell-site location information, or CSLI, which are geolocation records produced by users’ cell phones communicating with cell towers and stored by wireless providers. The court held that because CSLI provides “an intimate window into a person’s life,” police must obtain a warrant to collect it.

Sens. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., Rand Paul, R-Ky., Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., and Steve Daines, R-Mont., penned a letter to recently appointed Attorney General William Barr probing his views on the broad collection of cellular metadata and asking a series of questions encompassing how the Carpenter decision has impacted the practices and policies of government surveillance.

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