"Too Many To Count": The Global Persecution Of Christians | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

"Too Many To Count": The Global Persecution Of Christians

Authored by Raymond Ibrahim via The Gatestone Institute,

Today is one of the International Days of Prayer for the Persecuted Church (IDOP). Initiated over 20 years ago by the World Evangelical Alliance, 100,000 congregations around the world and millions of Christians participate on this day.

"This November let us unite in prayer for our persecuted brothers and sisters," IDOP noted in a brief video that highlights a few examples of recent persecution, including the Easter Sunday church bombings in Sri Lanka and the ongoing slaughter of Christians by Islamic groups in Nigeria and, increasingly, Burkina Faso.

Statistics bear out this grim assertion: "4,136 Christians were killed for faith-related reasons," noted Open Doors in its World Watch List 2019. "On average, that's 11 Christians killed every day for their faith." Additionally, "2,625 Christians were detained without trial, arrested, sentenced and imprisoned" and "1,266 churches or Christian buildings were attacked."

The report further states that more than 245 million Christians around the world are currently suffering from persecution. In other words, "1 in 9 Christians experience high levels of persecution worldwide."

Webmaster's Commentary: 

I knew that the numbers here were grim, but I did not realize that they were this grim.

But looking at these numbers, we cannot forget that Christians clobbering other Christians, for differences in orthodoxy, has happened during this religion's history as well; I am very relieved that, for the most part, Christians have grown up, and this has stopped, and Christians now have a good track record of working with other denominations of Christians toward common goals of "lifting people up, who have fallen by the wayside."

One of the most wonderful opportunities for giving time, and energy, on Oahu, was for a food distribution program, headed up by a wonderful Dominican Nun, and co-sponsored by an equally wonderful person from my Methodist congregation in Aiea.

No one, that I can remember, ever said a nasty word, or put in a dig, to either the Catholics or Protestants who volunteered to help families judged by the State of Hawaii as Food-Insecure. We simply and collectively, had "our eyes on the prize" of making sure that people not only ate a nice meal, when they came, but also had bags of food to take home, with which to feed their families.

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