Why Does It Feel Like We're In "Life During Wartime"? | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

Why Does It Feel Like We're In "Life During Wartime"?

The laughably hopeless hope is that by propping up the corpses, the populace will discern some faint flicker of life in the decaying carcasses and return to their free-spending ways.

Call it cultural synchronicity, but it increasingly feels like we're living in the 1979 Talking Heads song Life During Wartime, which was anchored by the lyric "This Ain't No Party, This Ain't No Disco, This Ain't No Foolin' Around." Indeed.

It also feels like Life During Wartime because the propaganda is so blatant and intense: we're winning the war on Covid-19, and our wars on everything else, too, of course, as war is the favored metaphor and favored policy at the end of the Empire.

The ceaseless propaganda is that "a vaccine is right around the corner." The inconvenient reality is that Corporate Insiders Pocket $1 Billion in Rush for Coronavirus Vaccine: Well-timed stock bets have generated big profits for senior executives and board members at companies developing vaccines and treatments.

In other words, wartime profiteering isn't just allowed, it's encouraged--yet another sign that we're in the final decay/collapse phase of Imperial Pretensions.

It's easy to mix up the propaganda and the counter-propaganda, because they're both so extreme. There is no middle ground, only pre-packaged positions which dictate which "data" is cherry-picked to support the political partisanship that's being defended.

Is Data Our New False Religion? (June 23, 2020)

Comments

Life During Wartime

Gleiwitz

This Spring, while dealing with the early days of lockdown, I read an old book that had been on my list to read for quite some time: Destination Chungking, by Han Suyin. She tells of her experiences moving through China ahead of the Japanese takeover of much of China during World War II. I learned a little about the history of Wuhan and other places.

In the end, Suyin and her husband have settled in Chungking, far enough inland that they feel safe from Japanese attacks. But then the bombing raids begin. Reading through the last chapters, I understood what it is like to live through daily bombing raids. I am very thankful that - so far - our situation is nowhere near that bad.

Gleiwitz

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